Top Bar
           
Bottom Bar

Forensics Events

This is the logo created and used by NCIMS for our forensics program.Interpretive Events

Dramatic Interpretation
Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, this event focuses on the student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance, and state the title and the author.

Duo Interpretation
Two competitors team up to deliver a ten-minute performance of a published play or story. Using off-stage focus, competitors convey emotion and environment through a variety of performance techniques focusing on the relationships and interactions between the characters. No props or costumes are used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the students to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

Humorous Interpretation
Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

Storytelling
Unlike stage acting, storytelling is an art that engages the audience in a dynamic, interactive manner, to allow spectators to be drawn in to the world illustrated by the storyteller. A good storyteller understands his or her personality well enough to tailor stories to his/her style, and vocal and physical abilities.

Public Speaking Events

Extemporaneous Speaking
Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to national and international current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. Topics may include political matters, country-specific issues, regional concerns, foreign policy, economic concerns, U.S. foreign policy, etc. The speech is delivered from memory.

Original Oratory
Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and can be informative or persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.

Public Forum Debate
Public Forum involves opposing teams of two, debating a topic concerning a current event. Proceeding a coin toss, the winners choose which side to debate (PRO or CON) or which speaker position they prefer (1st or 2nd), and the other team receives the remaining option. Students present cases, engage in rebuttal and refutation, and also participate in a “crossfire” (similar to a cross examination) with the opportunity to question the opposing team.  Often times community members are recruited to judge this event.

National Speech & Debate Association © 2014-2015

.........................................................................................................................................
Published by Pamela Sands on September 24, 2019